2014 / 2015 Performance Season
“Trying to convey Melnick’s brilliance is like trying to grasp a silver trout in a running stream. She is indeed a force of nature.” -Village Voice
September 5-6, 2014 at 8p

Jodi Melnick

Moment Marigold

Moment Marigold has not happened yet, it is happening right now. This new dance will evolve, transform, develop, adapt, polish, refine, explode, crash and land, up until it's first performance at ADI. Moment Marigold  is a dance for three woman exploring solo and trio formations — a gathering of entangled knots of actions and pauses unknotting itself into this new creation. The creative process is driven by Melnick’s steady love and devotion with movement and exploring a multitude of methods and dance modalities, landscapes, schematic and autographic. Movement will transform into feelings and emotions, and abstractions will reveal hidden narratives. Photo credit: Alex Escalante
“…this piece showed that no choreographer today has a more compelling mastery of the postmodern genre of dance deriving from Trisha Brown…” -Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times
September 19-20, 2014 at 8p

Vicky Shick

Everything You See

Everything You See, a collaboration between Vicky Shick (choreography), Barbara Kilpatrick (costume and set design) and Elise Kermani (sound design) is an entry into commotion sitting alongside a devotion to intimacy and a passion for physical detail. The audience sits on opposite sides of a semi-transparent fiberglass mesh curtain designed by Kilpatrick that horizontally bisects the stage, revealing two dances performed simultaneously. Kermani’s sound composition mirrors and enlivens the texturing and layering of the overlapping duets and trios performed by the ten dancers. Lighting design is by Carol Mullins. Photo credit: Anjola Toro
“One of the most innovative choreographers of this generation” -Mikhail Baryshnikov
October 3-4, 2014 at 8p

Aszure Barton & Artists

AWÁA

Awáa celebrates and nurtures human experience and universal spirit. Barton builds her vision by distinguishing and nurturing the individual stories of each artist. She intertwines their voices to create and develop a distinct, collective language which then becomes the foundation of the work. Photo credit: Kim Williams
“Ivy Baldwin has a wild imagination...
unafraid of testing her audience's limits.”
-The New York Times
October 17-18, 2014 at 8p

Ivy Baldwin Dance

Oxbow

Oxbow—named for the remnant lakes that slowly create themselves only to be left behind—is an evening-length dance which explores the inexorable nature of the two forces that contain us all: space and time; geology and chronology. Bound together they form an unknowing and indifferent vessel for our every event and experience, our messy, intimate, human concerns of loss, love, and loneliness.

Oxbow features performers Anna Carapetyan, Lawrence Cassella, Eleanor Smith, Ryan Tracy, and Katie Workum, with music composed by longtime collaborator Justin Jones. The set is a sculptural landscape created by installation artists Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen.

Named 2014 Guggenheim Fellow. Photo credit: Andy Romer
“Unique, rich and evolving. An extraordinary experience.”
-Ynet News (Israel)
October 24-25, 2014 at 8p

Vertigo Dance Company

[Israel]

Reshimo

Reshimo - the imprint of a past impression left within, a Kabbalistic idea pertaining to the impression of light, the fine outline which remains when the lights are gone. In this new piece for Jerusalem-based Vertigo Dance Company, choreographer Noa Wertheim explores the passages between abstract and chaotic endless motion and the defined moment. Tracing the hidden primal existence to evoke passion towards everything that is contained within time and space including intervals and suspension. Incorporating rhythmic animation and playfulness, Wertheim’s creative process provides for a new reflection on being present in the moment while observing the inner turmoil and accumulated burdens. This creates a pattern-free space — a magnetic realm hosting the search for emotions, knowledge and creation. Exploring the remanence of a vacant space, this is a journey of the receptive soul as Reshimo lights the way to a future state.  Photo credit: Mayan Hotam
“Mr. Greenberg’s artistry resonates through its confluence of the random and the necessary; the continuous stream of motion in which no one moment is particularly important and each is beautiful.”
-The New York Times
November 14-15, 2014 at 8p

Neil Greenberg

this

this, a new work by Neil Greenberg (dance), Steve Roden (sound) and Joe Levasseur (lighting), will continue Greenberg’s ongoing investigation of meaning-making, exploring both the “isness” of the performance moment and the seemingly inescapable human desire to make meaning. Five dancers will engage with complex and idiosyncratic movement – culled from videotaped improvisations, learned verbatim – that, along with lighting and music materials, will be continually recast, reconfigured, recoded. A related focus will be the three collaborators’ new working relationships, looking at the materials onstage as performing, rather than representing these relationships. "Isness" unfolds not as finite content, but as discovery and sense of possibility.

 

this will premiere at New York Live Arts in December 2014. Photo credit: Frank Mullaney
“Full of detail and surprises...This woman should get more work.”
-The New York Times
November 21-22, 2014 at 8p

Ballet ADI
with Loni Landon

ADI's resident company "...is a small flexible entity that provides the Washington area with new works and exciting performances. Professional standards were set..."
-George Jackson, Dance View Times

ADI’s resident dance company returns with new works by Ballet ADI Artistic Director Runqiao Du and guest choreographer Loni Landon. Du, a former principal dancer with The Washington Ballet and The Suzanne Farrell Ballet, will create a new work for Ballet ADI’s dancers that will surely become another audience favorite. Landon, a Juilliard graduate and 2013 Princess Grace Choreography Fellowship recipient whose work has been called edgy, detailed, and sophisticated, will share the program with a new work that explores societal roles and the compromises we make in our lives and our relationships by wanting or having various identities. Photo credit: Christopher Duggan
“One of the most significant choreographers today.”
-The New York Times
January 23-24, 2015 at 8p

Susan Marshall

New Work

In Collaboration with Suzanne Bocanegra & Jason Treuting

 

Choreographer Susan Marshall has set over 40 dances on her own company, and has also created works for Lyon Opera Ballet, Frankfurt Ballet, Boston Ballet, and Mikhail Baryshnikov. A 2000 recipient of a MacArthur fellowship, Marshall has received numerous other awards, including three New York Dance and Performance Awards (BESSIES) for Outstanding Choreographic Achievement. Marshall has served as Director of Dance at Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts since September 2009.
“Ferver’s performances are so extreme that they sometimes look and feel like exorcisms.” -The New Yorker
February 20-21, 2015 at 8p

Jack Ferver

Jack Ferver’s dances use energetic choreography and precise language to explore the tragicomedy of the human psyche. His work shifts between moments of grand theatricality and stark naturalism, humorously peering into dark corners of modern life and insightfully speaking to the experiences and concerns of the millennial generation. Since 2007, Ferver’s work has been seen in many varied spaces, including The French Institute Alliance Francaise (NYC), The Kitchen (NYC), The Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, MA), PS 122 (NYC), The New Museum (NYC), DiverseWorks (Houston, TX), Danspace Project (NYC), Abrons Arts Center (NYC), and Théâtre de Vanves in France. Ferver’s acting credits include the film Gayby, Strangers With Candy (Comedy Central), and numerous other film and theatre projects. His writing has been published in the magazine Novembre, and he has curated for Danspace Project, Center for Performance Research, and Dance New Amsterdam. He is adjunct faculty at NYU and has taught at SUNY Purchase, Bard College, and has set choreography at The Juilliard School. Photo credit: Yaniv Schulman
“Michelle Dorrance has already proven herself to be one of the most imaginative tap choreographers working today.”
-Brian Seibert, The New Yorker
March 6-7, 2015 at 8p

Dorrance Dance

The Blues Project

The Blues Project is a collaboration between Dorrance Dance Artistic Director, Michelle Dorrance; choreographers and soloists, Derick K. Grant and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards and award-winning musician, composer and founder of the band BIGLoveley, Toshi Reagon. The music is performed live by Reagon and musicians on acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass, drums, percussion and violin. The show features some of todays' best tap artists. The Boston Globe said of the work "this compilation of original blues makes loving reference to its musical past: It’s a little bit country, a little bit rock ’n’ roll, yes, but also very funky and wonderfully kick-ass. This is the hair of the dog I’d like to listen to the next time I’m feeling, well, a little blue." Photo credit: Christopher Duggan
“Not your mother’s modern dance…”
-The Village Voice
March 27-28, 2015 at 8p

David Neumann

I Understand Everything Better

I Understand Everything Better is a multi-disciplinary performance piece that explores the impulse to report on calamity, the consciousness of traumatic change, and one's proximity to dying. A union of theater and dance-making methodologies, I Understand  Everything Better will incorporate innovative technology, weather reports, and personal narratives all within a framework composed of elements drawn from classical Japanese dance and theater. Photo credit: Maria Baranova
“Those Urban Bush Women! How strong they are, how fierce, how smart. Their expressive powers shake the theater!“
-Deborah Jowitt, The Village Voice
April 17-18, 2015 at 8p

Urban Bush Women

Walking with 'Trane, Chapter 2

Walking with ‘Trane is a suite of works based on the life and artistic imprint of jazz pioneer John Coltrane as conceived by Urban Bush Women's Founding Artistic Director, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar. In Walking with ‘Trane, Chapter 2, co-choreographers Zollar and UBW dancer Samantha Speis plunge the depths of Coltrane's formidable legacy, taking inspiration from the making of and music from Coltrane's album A Love Supreme. This chapter is being developed in partnership with George Caldwell, one of modern jazz's current pre-eminent players, who is creating new music around the legacy of one of jazz music's greatest innovators.

 

Urban Bush Women will return in fall 2015 with Walking with ‘Trane: Chapter 3 as part of ADI Incubator. Photo credit: Rick McCullough
“There’s a bit of Lucinda Childs in her coolly, beautiful, aristocratic exterior.” -The New York Times
April 24-25, 2015 at 8p

Joanna Kotze

FIND YOURSELF HERE

After creating and performing three separate trios - each trio a collaboration between two dancers and one visual artist created in a short, intensive period of time and connected to a specific space - choreographer Joanna Kotze and her collaborators present Find Yourself Here, an evening-length dance performance that brings the research, discoveries and unique people from these three trios together into one theater. With a spectrum between tension and harmony, isolation and togetherness, the performers use movement as a potent, immediate form of dialogue between bodies and disciplines, highlighting the boundaries and shared concerns of visual art and performance and the forums for presenting each.
Named 2013 Bessie Award Recipient For Outstanding Emerging Choreographer. Photo credit: Ayala Gazit
“Charming and poignant.”
-Jennifer Dunning,The New York Times
May 29-30, 2015 at 8p

Christopher K. Morgan

Limited Visibility
Shedding light on the things we hide from public view…

Limited Visibility invites the dancers of Christopher K. Morgan & Artists to reveal things about themselves they usually don't share in public. The performers create intimate spaces on stage using an array of lighting sources they control themselves; from halogen work lights, to overhead fluorescent garage lighting, to paper lanterns. The evening length work is a suite of dances connected in theme and design, incorporating Morgan's sinuous, athletic movement style and an industrial, sleek design that "makes for a fascinating backdrop against which the dancers laid bare their souls" (Carmel Morgan, Ballet-Dance Magazine). Photo credit: Brianne Bland