• ADI Incubator
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“Charming and poignant.”
-Jennifer Dunning,The New York Times
May 29-30, 2015 at 8p

Christopher K. Morgan & Artists

Limited Visibility
Shedding light on the things we hide from public view…

Limited Visibility invites the dancers of Christopher K. Morgan & Artists to reveal things about themselves they usually don’t share in public. The performers create intimate spaces on stage using an array of lighting sources they control themselves; from halogen work lights, to overhead fluorescent garage lighting, to paper lanterns. The evening length work is a suite of dances connected in theme and design, incorporating Morgan’s sinuous, athletic movement style and an industrial, sleek design that “makes for a fascinating backdrop against which the dancers laid bare their souls” (Carmel Morgan, Ballet-Dance Magazine).

Photo credit: Brianne Bland

“uncannily inviting…left the mind churning”
-The New York Times
September 11-12, 2015 at 8p

Jillian Peña

Polly Pocket: Expansion Pack

Taking inspiration from ballet, psychoanalysis, queer theory, and Marxism, Polly Pocket is an epic dance drama in which viewers glimpse a trio in their own private world. Casting the audience as outsiders, the dancers negotiate their relationships to themselves and each other, navigating desire, kinship, conflict and compromise.
Photo credit: Chris Sellers
“Those Urban Bush Women! How strong they are, how fierce, how smart. Their expressive powers shake the theater!”
-Deborah Jowitt, The Village Voice
September 25-26, 2015 at 8p

Urban Bush Women

Walking with 'Trane

Walking with ‘Trane is a suite of works based on the life and artistic imprint of jazz pioneer John Coltrane as conceived by Urban Bush Women's Founding Artistic Director, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar.
Photo credit: Rick McCullough
“The world Schlichting reveals is full of clever kinetic asides, streamlined beauty, hints of mischief and thoughtful juxtapositions.”
-Minneapolis Star Tribune
October 2-3, 2015 at 8p

Chris Schlichting

Stripe Tease

Recent winner of the American Dance Institute's Commissioned Artist Award, and steadily gaining national attention, Chris Schlichting creates beautifully designed, meticulously constructed dance worlds combining movement, visual art, and music. Named Best Choreographer in 2013 by Minneapolis/St.Paul's City Pages, his most recent collaboration is with rock/pop guitarist Jeremy Ylvisaker (Andrew Bird) and his band Alpha Consumer, whose repetition of musical phrasing is a perfect foil for Schlichting’s movement art. The collaboration also features Minnesota-based visual artist Jennifer Davis, whose collages and paintings strike a magical balance between childlike playfulness and dark yearnings.
“(Whelan is) America’s greatest contemporary ballerina.”
-The New York Times
October 23-24, 2015 at 8p

Wendy Whelan | Jock Soto
David Neumann

Hagoromo
AMERICAN OPERA PROJECTS

Hagoromo is a new, multidisciplinary work of dance-theater inspired by one of the masterpieces of Japanese Noh drama and performed by two of America’s greatest dancers, Wendy Whelan and Jock Soto, accompanied by International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE).
Photo credit: Nisian Hughes
“They’ve been at it a long time, splicing dance and theater. But still it bears remarking upon; there are remarkably few artists who do it half as well as this influential duo”
-The New York Times
November 6-7, 2015 at 8p
November 8, 2015 at 2pm

Big Dance Theater

BIG DANCE: SHORT FORM

BIG DANCE: SHORT FORM is Big Dance Theater, distilled. The company returns to its movement roots in an evening of short-form works, playfully re-imagining the conventions of a "rep show", presenting the company's unique blend of dance theater on an intimate scale. Works will include two world premieres, rarely seen revivals, and re-staged pieces performed for the first time by the BDT ensemble and its signature design team.

Looking to imagery from short-form literary works including short stories, poetry, love letters and text messages, Big Dance will create performance events that embrace the brief, granular, close range, diaristic, concise, anecdotal and microscopic. Duration is explored for its many meanings and downsizing is prized.

Photo credit: Julieta Cervantes
“Zuštiak creates no movement that looks like dancing for its own sake. It becomes a statement of identity, a task to be completed, an urge to be satisfied.”
-Deborah Jowitt, ARTSJOURNAL
November 20-21, 2015 at 8p

Palissimo

Custodians of Beauty

Can anything still strike a contemporary spectator facing modern disenchantment as beautiful?
Choreographer/director Pavel Zuštiak asks in Custodians of Beauty, his new work at the intersection of dance, live music, and visual arts that continues his acclaimed working history with Christian Frederickson (composer/musician) and Joe Levasseur (lighting design). Custodians of Beauty promises to build on Zuštiak’s continued theatrical and movement investigation while examining the multiplicity of concepts of beauty and its permanence within art. From Plato, via Pope Benedict XVI to Susan Sontag, the new work will draw from a fascinating range of contextual sources while invoking beauty that can shock and transform us.
Matthew Rogers, Jaro Vinarsky and Pavel Zuštiak in Endangered Pieces © Yi-Chun Wu
“It was an uncompromisingly honest and emotional performance… ”
-Kansas State Collegian
February 5-6, 2016 at 8p

Joe Goode Performance Group

The Resilience Project

What does it mean to be resilient?

 "Resilience to me is about falling down and getting up. It is about absorbing the impossible difficulties that come one’s way. I have discovered through doing these interviews, that it can also be about pressing the restart button, about accepting tragic and often devastating circumstances, and moving on to create a new condition for one’s life." -Joe Goode

Joe Goode Performance Group's The Resilience Project aims to explore how we as humans deal with trauma, using storytelling and performance as a way of finding universality and strength in the face of adversity.
Photo credit: RJ Muna
“Jonah Bokaer is one of the mystery men of American dance…both subdued and intense, alert and unfathomable, quietly graceful and utterly focused.”
-The New York Times
February 26-27, 2016 at 8p

Jonah Bokaer

Why Patterns | Recess

Why Patterns is a new choreography for stage, gallery, and alternative exhibition space. The project examines pattern recognition, design, and perceptual faculties as they apply to the human body and visual imaging.

The work RECESS, a collaboration between choreographer Jonah Bokaer and artist/architect Daniel Arsham is a constantly evolving and fluid dialogue between the two, exploring movement, representation, temporality, memory, and space.

“The guiding spirits behind the theater of mixed forms are often choreographers…
Jane Comfort is one of the most fertile minds in this genre.”
-The New York Times
March 18-19, 2016 at 8p
NYC premiere June 2016

Jane Comfort & Company

New Work

The new work will focus on the dance of humanity as performed each second in the urban theater as people go about their daily lives. The myriad encounters that occur as people cross, flow, interrupt, circle and redirect their topography will translate into formal structures, with the implied narratives that underlie many of these moments of connection.
“A tissue of small tightly woven mysteries and surprises. ”
-The New York Times
April 1-2, 2016 at 8p

Pam Tanowitz & Ballet ADI

the story progresses as if on a dream of glittering surfaces

In a shared evening of new work, award-winning choreographer Pam Tanowitz and ADI's Runqiao Du share an evening of contemporary work that showcases each artist's aesthetic.

the story progresses as if in a dream of glittering surfaces is a love letter to romantic ballets. The new dance exploresperforming rituals, mining codified techniques in an unusually layered contemporary collage. Imbued with rich, mysterious undertones, the work plays with narrative and abstraction, formality and immediacy, creating a progression of images that dissolve and reappear throughout the work’s path. The dance is set to a new electronic score by longtime collaborator Dan Siegler and a score by Julia Wolfe
Photo credit: RJ Muna
“A titan of the 1960s and ’70s avant-garde.”
-The New York Times
April 15-16, 2016 at 8p

Steve Paxton

Bound

Bound is a dance performance composed of vignettes; each is isolated, but like numbers in a column, they begin to add up to something larger as they accumulate. Some episodes are dry but resonate poetic thoughts. Some are unchoreographed dance remarks. The musics are eclectic, and the images are not immediately logical. Perhaps it is like a chance meeting with a slightly drunken man in a quiet bar. You begin to make conversation, and gradually his disjointed story emerges, lived, as lives are, one moment after another, but now remembered as fragments of a journey, finally to explain how he came to be sitting alone, elbows on a bar and a glass in hand, talking to you. “Once upon a time, I was a man....”
“visually arresting and physically impressive… ”
Leigh Witchel, New York Post
April 29-30, 2016 at 8p
NYC premiere June 2016

Brian Brooks Moving Company

New Work

Choreographer Brian Brooks will examine and amplify the living, moving body in his next piece. A sculptural installation will immerse his group’s latest dance in a type of three-dimensional map, designed and constructed by Brooks with lighting designed by third time collaborator Joe Levasseur. Building upon a series of works that have stretched tension cables, fluorescent lights, and other industrial materials to surround both performers and audience, his new (untitled installation) aims to capture each passing moment as experienced by the dancers.
Introducing ADI / NYC

For five weeks in Summer 2016, ADI will bring our Incubator production residency program to The Kitchen — a performance space with a long history of supporting innovative artists and progressive work. A unique bi-city initiative, ADI/NYC & ADI/MD will support a total of ten residency weeks for five leading American choreographers, culminating with New York Premiere performances at The Kitchen by Yvonne Rainer, Jane Comfort, Brian Brooks, Jack Ferver, and Susan Marshall.

“Ms. Rainer cannot be skipped.”
-The New York Times
June 2-4, 2016

Yvonne Rainer

The Concept of Dust, or How do you look when there's nothing left to move? (Moving On)

"The Concept of Dust, or How do you look when there's nothing left to move? (Moving On) is an ongoing work-in-progress that interweaves formal dance and personal themes of aging and mortality with humor and diverse texts — intermittently read by Rainer and the dancers — dealing with ancient Mideast dynasties, paleontological findings, and literary quotations.
“visually arresting and physically impressive…”
Leigh Witchel, New York Post
June 9-11, 2016

Brian Brooks Moving Company

New Work

Choreographer Brian Brooks will examine and amplify the living, moving body in his next piece. A sculptural installation will immerse his group’s latest dance in a type of three-dimensional map, designed and constructed by Brooks with lighting designed by third time collaborator Joe Levasseur. Building upon a series of works that have stretched tension cables, fluorescent lights, and other industrial materials to surround both performers and audience, his new (untitled installation) aims to capture each passing moment as experienced by the dancers.
“The guiding spirits behind the theater of mixed forms are often choreographers…
Jane Comfort is one of the most fertile minds in this genre.”
-The New York Times
June 16-18, 2016

Jane Comfort & Company

New Work

The new work will focus on the dance of humanity as performed each second in the urban theater as people go about their daily lives. The myriad encounters that occur as people cross, flow, interrupt, circle and redirect their topography will translate into formal structures, with the implied narratives that underlie many of these moments of connection.
“One of the most significant choreographers today.”
-The New York Times
June 23-25, 2016

Susan Marshall
Jason Treuting &
Suzanne Bocanegra

Chromatic

Choreographer Susan Marshall, composer Jason Treuting and visual artist Suzanne Bocanegra come together in Chromatic. Inspired by Josef Albers’ 1963 masterpiece of color theory Interaction of Color, Chromatic generates its energy from collisions of color, sound, action, object and scale. The artists perform this work themselves – constructing and deconstructing, making and remaking.
“We can’t look away, and naturally, we don’t want to.”
-The New York Times
June 30-July 2, 2016

Jack Ferver

I Want You to Want Me

I thought I would try to make something for everyone. You know, like ballet or a good subscription audience kind of play. I consider myself a populist, but some people really hate my work. They even hate me they hate my work so much. So I thought: 'Well, why don’t I make a really pretty ballet or a play about a straight couple and their issues?” So that’s what I’m going to do. Oh, I also just wanted to say, that not everyone is going to make it. I don’t mean make it to the show. I mean make it out of the show alive.'
- Jack Ferver on I Want You To Want Me